It’s time to expand the definition of justice. Around the globe, people living with disabilities experience inequality in all its forms. To build a world where everyone is equal, we need to recognize how disability interconnects with the issues of social justice and follow the lead of the individuals at the center of the fight.

By centering intersectionality and the voices of those most marginalized—from people of color and queer to immigrants and indigenous people—disability justice encourages us to see how society’s diverse systems of oppression reinforce each other and affect every member of the disability community.

Ending inequality is a shared struggle, and only by working together will we remove the obstacles ahead and create a future of opportunity for all.

This video will be played via Able Player, which allows users to vary the playback speed and to access captions, audio descriptions, and interactive and accessible transcripts. Learn more about inclusive media at Rooted in Rights.

Leaders from across the disability community share their views on disability and why an intersectional approach is needed.

Featuring interviews and footage of Jane Akinyi, Rabia Belt, Lawrence Carter-Long, Rebecca Cokley, Dessa Cosma, Ryan Easterly, Claudia Gordon, Keri Gray, Sara Minkara, Maddy Ruvolo, and Alice Wong.

Special thanks to Detroit Disability Power for allowing us to use its Guiding Principles.

This video is displayed using Able Player, a fully accessible media player. To learn more about inclusive media, we recommend this guide from Rooted in Rights.

No Equality Without Everyone

Two people in wheelchairs lead a protest with a banner that reads “Disabled People’s Liberation Front” with a crowd behind them.

As the Americans with Disabilities Act turns 30, president Darren Walker reflects on the role of philanthropy, the intersections of social justice, and why integrating disability into the fight for equality is the only path forward.

Read more from Darren Walker

Where disability and social justice intersect

Meet the Fellows

Disability Futures Fellows

Disability Futures is an initiative—developed in partnership with The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation and administered by United States Artists—to spotlight the work of disabled creatives across disciplines and geography.

A grid of black and white pictures of the Disability Fellows.

Watch The Festival

Disability Futures Virtual Festival

This dynamic convening of disabled creative practitioners took place July 19-20, 2021; we celebrated and honored the work of the DISABILITY FUTURES fellows and their collaborators. The event featured American Sign Language (ASL) and live closed captioning and audio descriptions in English.

Pink clouds background with black type that reads Disability Futures Virtual Festival

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Social Justice: What’s disability got to do with it?

Interested in accelerating your work through making disability-inclusive changes in your organization? Then, this video is for you!

Image of four disability justice leaders over a green circle on a black background.

Perspective

Understanding our country’s long history of systemic discrimination and exclusion of people with disabilities challenges us as individuals and organizations to weed out deeply engrained ideas and practices.

Stacy Kono,
Hand in Hand

Image of Stacy Kono wearing a blue top against a light green background.

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Voting Rights for All

Join disability justice leaders Imani Barbarin, Michelle Bishop and Bianca Laureano for a conversation about barriers people with disabilities face in the voting process and ways we can all support solutions.

Image of three disability justice leaders over a green circle

Fact

1 billion people, or 15% of the world’s population, live with some form of disability.

Read the WHO World Report on Disability

A young black boy with autism smiles with his arms raised in the schoolyard. He is wearing a bright orange puffy coat.

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A New Social Contract: Centering Disability in the Future of Work

Before COVID-19, people with disabilities were 40% less likely to be employed. Disability justice and rights leaders Day Al-Mohamed, Teresa Danso-Danquah, and Taryn Williams imagine rebuilding our economy with inclusive policies and workplaces that ensure safe, fair work for all.

Image of four disability justice leaders over a green circle on a black background.

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“Disability is a beautiful part of our society. It’s an asset.”

Sara Minkara,
Empowerment Through Integration

Sara Minkara, a blind Lebanese-American woman, wearing a white headscarf holds her cane with both hands to her right while seated.

A History Lesson

Lawrence Carter-Long of Disability Rights Education and Defense Fund, a Ford grantee, provides a short history on the fight for disability rights, illustrating its role in America’s larger movement for civil rights and how this community-led effort has been intersectional from the start.

This video will be played via Able Player, which allows users to vary the playback speed and to access captions, audio descriptions, and interactive and accessible transcripts. Learn more about inclusive media at Rooted in Rights.

Where are you in your journey?

Join the conversation.
#DisabilityDemandsJustice

Our work on Disability

We believe integrating disability into the fight for justice is the only path to achieve equality. Learn more about our journey as we move beyond inclusion toward the values of disability justice.