10 years after Katrina: Learning from New Orleans

Join the conversation on social media using the hashtag #Katrina10.

We are committed to the long-term success of New Orleans. Since 2005, the foundation has made more than $45 million in grants to 100 organizations to help rebuild New Orleans as a more just, inclusive, and vibrant place to live. We are working to lift the voices of grassroots community groups, local leaders, and city residents who are working everyday to transform the city.

As we mark the 10th anniversary of Hurricane Katrina, we celebrate the significant progress New Orleans has made over the past decade: The region has recovered nearly all its pre-Katrina jobs, there are continuing signs of economic growth, and there is a spirit of optimism and resilience in the city. At the same time, poverty and inequality have widened since the storm. Too many residents remain stuck in low-wage jobs. And Katrina also surfaced deeper injustices: In the wake of the storm, this country saw the consequences of concentrated poverty, racism, and inequality starkly revealed—and an uneven recovery process that often perpetuated those divides.

New Orleans has always been a great city. Now it has an opportunity to become a just city: a city rooted in inclusivity, where fairness and equity are at the heart of all urban planning, housing, and transportation infrastructure efforts. A city where all people have a voice in shaping the future of their communities, and are empowered to be agents of change. A city where all people have access to a wealth of opportunities. A city that is sustainable, prosperous, and alive with possibility.

Dean Marshall looks at the 17th Street Canal and floodwall. New Orleans, LA. July 18, 2015. Photo credit & ©: Corbis/Philip Gould Dean Marshall looks at the 17th Street Canal and floodwall. "I come out here everyday just to see where it all happened," he says.

Join the conversation on social media using the hashtag #Katrina10.

We are committed to the long-term success of New Orleans. Since 2005, the foundation has made more than $45 million in grants to 100 organizations to help rebuild New Orleans as a more just, inclusive, and vibrant place to live. We are working to lift the voices of grassroots community groups, local leaders, and city residents who are working everyday to transform the city.

As we mark the 10th anniversary of Hurricane Katrina, we celebrate the significant progress New Orleans has made over the past decade: The region has recovered nearly all its pre-Katrina jobs, there are continuing signs of economic growth, and there is a spirit of optimism and resilience in the city. At the same time, poverty and inequality have widened since the storm. Too many residents remain stuck in low-wage jobs. And Katrina also surfaced deeper injustices: In the wake of the storm, this country saw the consequences of concentrated poverty, racism, and inequality starkly revealed—and an uneven recovery process that often perpetuated those divides.

 

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The Ford Foundation

The Ford Foundation is an independent, nonprofit grant-making organization. For more than 75 years it has worked with courageous people on the frontlines of social change worldwide, guided by its mission to strengthen democratic values, reduce poverty and injustice, promote international cooperation, and advance human achievement. With headquarters in New York, the foundation has offices in Latin America, Africa, the Middle East, and Asia.